But I Can't Move The Mountains For You

Ask me anything   "we are what we repeatedly do" - Aristotle

hismarmorealcalm:

Karnak temple precinct of Amun  The columns of the hypostyle hall between second and third pylons

hismarmorealcalm:

Karnak temple precinct of Amun  The columns of the hypostyle hall between second and third pylons

(via superkintaro)

— 1 week ago with 51 notes

art-of-swords:

Sabre with undulated blade

  • Dated: 19th century
  • Culture: Indopersian
  • Measurements: overall length 76 cm

The sword has a large, undulated, double-edged, damask blade, ribbed at the centre, with a double fuller on the entire length except for the tip, which is slightly thicker. Apparently the blade is quite unusual.

The iron grip, of almost elliptical section, features a beak-shaped pommel bent on a side. The surface of the grip is decorated with silver-inlaid floral motifs and geometrical frames. The pommel has a relieved rosette on both faces.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Czerny’s International Auction House S.R.L.

— 1 week ago with 1500 notes
ancientcoins:

This, believe it or not, is a coin. It’s a coin of the polis of Olbia on the black sea coast, and it is a cast in the shape of a dolphin. In one of the most remarkable currencies of the ancient world, Olbia, literally the wealthy city, according to its name, chose to mint coins in a non-circular form for the first time since the invention of coins. The distinct form is generally attributed to the fact that the city of Olbia, located on the Black Sea, was at the fringes of the Greek world, therefore adapted Greek forms to fit their own needs. The large quantities of finds and the later appearance of dolphins on circular coins have convinced scholars that these were used in exchange.
The symbolism of the dolphin is believed to be religious, since the city held a large temple to Apollo Delphinios, Apollo of the Dolphins, which is also connected to the Apollo at Delphi. The image shown here, taken from a Greek vase, shows Apollo atop a tripod with his lyre, accompanied by dolphins.

The coins are undated through any kind of marking but are generally thought to be the product of the 5th or 4th centuries BCE. They are bronze and are generally a little more than an inch long.

ancientcoins:

This, believe it or not, is a coin. It’s a coin of the polis of Olbia on the black sea coast, and it is a cast in the shape of a dolphin. In one of the most remarkable currencies of the ancient world, Olbia, literally the wealthy city, according to its name, chose to mint coins in a non-circular form for the first time since the invention of coins. The distinct form is generally attributed to the fact that the city of Olbia, located on the Black Sea, was at the fringes of the Greek world, therefore adapted Greek forms to fit their own needs. The large quantities of finds and the later appearance of dolphins on circular coins have convinced scholars that these were used in exchange.

The symbolism of the dolphin is believed to be religious, since the city held a large temple to Apollo Delphinios, Apollo of the Dolphins, which is also connected to the Apollo at Delphi. The image shown here, taken from a Greek vase, shows Apollo atop a tripod with his lyre, accompanied by dolphins.

image

The coins are undated through any kind of marking but are generally thought to be the product of the 5th or 4th centuries BCE. They are bronze and are generally a little more than an inch long.

(via flammentanzerin)

— 1 week ago with 380 notes
How Stone-Age Despots Evolved →

archaeologicalnews:

image

The rulers of ancient Egypt lived in glorious opulence, decorating themselves with gold and perfumes and taking their treasures with them to the grave.

New research reveals how such a hierarchical, despotic system could arise from egalitarian hunter-gatherer…

— 1 week ago with 194 notes